This is an archived version of the Virtual Volunteering Project web site from January 2001.
The materials on the web site were written or compiled by Jayne Cravens.
The Virtual Volunteering Project has been discontinued.
The Virtual Volunteering Project web site IS NO LONGER UPDATED.
Email addresses associated with the Virtual Volunteering Project are no longer valid.
For any URL that no longer works, type the URL into archive.org
.
For new materials regarding online volunteering, see
Jayne Cravens' web site (the section on volunteerism-related resources).
 
 
 
 
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what is virtual volunteering?

Virtual volunteering means volunteer tasks completed, in whole or in part, via the Internet and a home or work computer or a hand held device (like a cell phone). It's also known as online volunteering, cyber service, telementoring, teletutoring, and various other names. Virtual volunteering allows agencies to expand the benefits of their volunteer programs, by allowing for more volunteers to participate, and by utilizing volunteers in new areas.

Many people actively search for volunteer opportunities they can complete via home or work computers, because of time constraints, personal preference, a disability or a home-based obligation that prevents them from volunteering on-site. Virtual volunteering allows anyone with Internet access to contribute time and expertise to not-for-profit organizations, schools, government offices and other agencies that utilize volunteer services.

Virtual volunteering is similar to telecommuting, except that, instead of online employees, these are online volunteers.

Many organizations now involve online volunteers, often in addition to their onsite volunteering program. The Virtual Volunteering Project documents outstanding cyber service programs and experiences and shares best practices and learnings about online volunteering via our Web site, as well as through VIRTUAL VERVE, our monthly e-mail newsletter, and in-person presentations and workshops.

Virtual volunteering does not mean that volunteers work ONLY via the Internet. Many organizations find a combination of onsite and online tasks for volunteers works best for everyone involved (volunteers, staff, clients). Assignments can have different levels of virtuality. For instance, one volunteer may interact with clients online but meet onsite with a staff member regularly; another may talk with a client via email in addition to their regular face-to-face visits.

Virtual volunteering sometimes also refers to the ways volunteer managers use the Internet to interact with all volunteers, regardless of where service is performed. For instance, some organizations allow volunteers to use e-mail to submit time sheets and progress reports, and other organizations use e-mail to communicate with all volunteers, rather than sending them materials via postal mail. The resources on the Virtual Volunteer Project site can help in these situations as well.

 
Also see:

 
 
Does Your Organization Already Involve Online Volunteers?
Then We Want to Hear From You!

Have you helped or do you help an organization
via your home or work computer?

Then We Want to Hear From You!

 
Interested in virtual volunteering? Our Project documents and shares best practices and learnings about virtual volunteering, both for agencies and volunteers, via our Web site, as well as through in-person presentations and workshops. Complete information about this Project and our work is available here on our Web site.


 
Information for those who wish to
quote from, copy and/or distribute the information on this Web site

 
If you find this or any other Virtual Volunteering Project information helpful, or would like to add information based on your own experience, please contact us.

If you do use Virtual Volunteering Project materials in your own workshop or trainings, or republish materials in your own publications, please let us know, so that we can track how this information is disseminated.


 

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All Rights Reserved.


 
This is an archived version of the Virtual Volunteering Project web site from January 2001.
The materials on the web site were written or compiled by Jayne Cravens.
The Virtual Volunteering Project has been discontinued.
The Virtual Volunteering Project web site IS NO LONGER UPDATED.
Email addresses associated with the Virtual Volunteering Project are no longer valid.
For any URL that no longer works, type the URL into archive.org
.
For new materials regarding online volunteering, see
Jayne Cravens' web site (the section on volunteerism-related resources).
 

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